Love Design Everywhere

Love Design Everywhere

For the Chicago Architecture Center, the main campus is the city itself

Basalt tiling in the tasting room comes from a river bed on the ranch, the remaining evidence of a river that flowed through the area , years ago. Thornley also repurposed excavated raw materials from the wine cave construction into a pair of -foot walls, made out of what looks like soil-turned-solid, that span the back of the Estate House. In the cave, a dome-shaped section was left unfinished, unveiling the stunning, red-orange rock into which it was dug.

“Our winemaking philosophy is to create terroir-inspired wines that tell the story of the vineyard they came from and the vintage year that they are grown,” says Hamel. “It made sense to us to make sure that flowed through the design of our Estate House, winery, and wine caves as well.”

Three Sticks

Wine tastings at Three Sticks, located right off the Historic Sonoma Plaza, take place inside a Vallejo-Castanada adobe, the longest-occupied residence in Sonoma during California’s Mexican Period. In , years after the adobe’s initial construction by the brother of Sonoma’s founder, General Mariano Vallejo, Three Sticks proprietors Bill and Eva Price acquired the property and began the painstaking restoration process for their winery.

Preservation of the structure was their top priority, so they enlisted the help of many professionals architects, historians, archaeologists, etc. to ensure that the adobe’s historical integrity remained intact. A refuse site was discovered during this process and throughout several digs at this spot, they discovered artifacts that date back to the s—including bottles, porcelain plates, vessels, tools, and dolls—many of which are now on display at the winery. In the end, the adobe’s original walls, doors, knobs, roof, siding, and some historical plantings in the garden courtyard were preserved.

Three Sticks hired renowned San Francisco-based designer Ken Fulk to transform the interior. The adobe’s living room is now a lounge, a former bedroom is the reception area, and the dining room is a tasting room. “We wanted an homage to the past, but not a false historical feeling,” says chief operating officer Prema Behan. “Ken’s ability to celebrate the past through materials and design, while still making the space feel utterly au courant and luxurious, made him an obvious choice for this project.” Fulk achieved this by using a blend of materials that were indicative of the s—like wood, stone, metal, leather, cowhide, and authentic adobe bricks—with both contemporary and antique furnishings. In the lounge, for instance, cast-resin desert tortoise shells hang on the walls, the floors have been replaced with handmade Mexican tiles, and a pair of midcentury modern orange chairs sit atop an antique Khotan rug.

“We did not want the home to feel like a house museum,” says Behan. “The adobe needed to be alive, relevant, and energetic so that guests could feel the living history of the building and celebrate the unique Sonoman, Californian, and Mexican heritage of our region.”

Artist Rafael Arana hand-painted a thistle pattern in the entry room and Three Sticks’ iconic black-and-white mural on the back wall of the enclosed patio, which depicts the site’s rich history leading up to the present. The garden bathroom also can’t be missed: It’s achieved fame all on its own thanks to its wall-to-wall plant and floral wallpaper.

Silver Oak

In , the venerable Silver Oak in Napa Valley opened up a second property in Sonoma County’s Alexander Valley. Set on a historic piece of land that was deeded to the wine region’s namesake, Cyrus Alexander, in , the winery unites the past and present with a modern, glass-walled interpretation of the classic barn, built with natural and recycled materials.

Designed by Daniel Piechota of Piechota Architecture, the glass creates the illusion of being outdoors, engulfed by the estate’s acres of cabernet sauvignon vines and the rolling hills of the Alexander Valley. “It was important to us culturally that we stay in touch with the agricultural side of winemaking,” says Silver Oak CEO David Duncan. “Fruit quality is the most important variable in fine wine, so we wanted our team and our customers to be immersed in the farming process and be able to see a grapevine from any point on the property.”

From the vineyard to the winery design, the driving force at Silver Oak is sustainability. Its Oakville winery was the first LEED Platinum-certified winery in the world, and now the Alexander Valley property is the second. But this time, it’s taken its mission even further. The net zero energy, net zero water winery—, rooftop solar panels emit percent of their energy needs—is currently under review for the Living Building Challenge, the most advanced measurement of sustainability in buildings.

Silver Oak’s team vetted a list of more than , construction and industrial materials for their environmental impacts before building. They used reclaimed redwood from old fermentation tanks used by a Cherokee winery in the s for siding as well as wood from naturally felled valley oak trees—which required removal for safety reasons—for flooring, wall, and ceiling panels. As for the insulation? The material was made with ground-up blue jeans.

Louis M. Martini Winery

In an effort to evolve with the ever-changing wine industry, many of Napa Valley’s most historic properties—including Clos Du Val, ZD Wines, and Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars—have undergone major restorations in recent years. But none of these undertakings have been as epic as the overhaul of Louis M. Martini, which opened its brand-new visitor center in the spring of .

“The original winery building, constructed in , is one of the first five wineries built in Napa Valley following the end of Prohibition,” says Jonathan Wendorf, Louis M. Martini’s estate manager. “We’ve been crafting cabernet here for generations. Everything connects with the working winery and the building’s historic legacy.”

Original terra-cotta wall tiles—which Martini brought up to Napa from a winery he had in Kingsburg in the ’s—cover the exterior and some of the interior walls. These historic squares juxtapose the emphatically modern interior that ushers the winery into the st century. Wine country’s most sought-after architect, Howard Backen of Backen & Gillam Architects, utilized industrial and reclaimed materials, like metal and oak, and built the roof out of materials recovered from a dog track in Santa Ana, California. Large glass doors on three sides create a seamless integration between the outside and interior, a signature feature of Backen’s designs.

The structure has myriad spaces scattered throughout its large, open floorplan, each dedicated to a different tasting experience. Tasting flights are offered at the dramatic Crown Bar in the center, which peers into the barrel room. To the left, the light-filled Heritage Lounge hosts seated wine and food pairings, while the private, study-like Founders Room pours tastes of library wines and barrel samples. To the right, a small lecture hall called the Wine Study is used for wine education. The glass doors of the Heritage Lounge open up to Martini Park, where guests relax in serene outdoor nooks. Groups can book shaded cabanas and indulge in wine and wood-fired pizzas as if they’re in Tuscan wine country.

And yet, the most extraordinary part of the restoration is hidden beneath the ground. Lined on both sides with old redwood casks, the Underground Cellar includes a wine library for older vintages housed inside an old bank vault that Martini purchased from a bank that was going out of business.

Source: togel online via pulsa

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